Review: The Boy Who Loved Rain by Gerard Kelly

The Boy Who Loved RainBook Details:

Author: Gerard Kelly
Genre: Adult Contemporary
PublisherLion Fiction
Pages: 320
Published: January 2015
Goodreads Rating: 4.08
I received this book in return for an honest review as part of a book tour for the novel. 

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Blurb:

They say that what you don’t know can’t hurt you. They’re wrong.

David Dryden, pastor of a high-profile church in London, is admired for his emphasis on the Christian family.

But all is not well in his own family. He and his wife, Fiona, have been glossing over his son Colom’s erratic behavior. Then, when a commitment to die is discovered in Colom’s room after the suicide of a school friend, David finds himself out of his depth–and Fiona, in panic, takes Colom and flees.

A wonderful, intelligent, and searching novel about the toxic nature of secrets, and the possibility of starting again.

My Thoughts:

The Boy Who Loved Rain is one of those books that creeps up on you and hooks you without even realizing it is happening. Admittedly, the first leg of the book doesn’t grab hold of your attention quite like the last 2/3 of the story, but it is definitely worth the slow start once you are in the heart of the story.

This is one of those novels I find hard reviewing because I don’t want to give anything away – it is much better if you, like I did, go into this story completely blind.

The story is about family, decisions, secrets, and discovery; it definitely isn’t a book you want to take lightly.

You feel so much frustration at the characters and the plot as you are reading because you, as a reader, may find it difficult to understand the choices of certain characters…especially the father, David. You are frustrated because you know there is more of the story to be told (especially at the beginning) and you aren’t getting it. This is why once things start moving about a third of the way into the novel and secrets begin to unveil themselves you can’t stop reading.

The book as an ongoing theme of rain running throughout the story; each chapter begins with a quote about rain and I think each quote certainly helps to relate the theme of the certain chapter. It’s a clever way of weaving the title and the theme through the book.

The imagery the book creates is amazing, Gerard Kelly made everything sound so beautiful and real. I certainly want to make a trip to Portivy now; it sounds lovely. And as a Canadian, it is nice to see the country represented in the book, it is not something you see too often with non-Canadian authors so it was refreshing to see!

I definitely recommend this book for anyone who enjoys books about family and just anyone who is looking for a very engaging read. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and I think many others would too.

My Rating:

3.5 out of 5 stars

About the Author:

Gerard Kelly

Gerard Kelly is a writer, preacher-poet, mac lover, coffee drinker and twitturgist. He and his wife Chrissie have lived and worked in the UK, France and the Netherlands and are popular speakers at conferences in Europe. In 1995 they founded Cafe-net, the European missions project that became The Bless Network in 2004. In 2009 they wrote ‘Intimate with the Ultimate’: a book on prayer and spirituality drawn from their many years of teaching and leadership across Europe. They currently live in Basse Normandy, France, where Bless are establishing a missional community.

– via Lion Hudson PLC

Review: How to Bake a Chocolate Soufflé by Carly Ellen Kramer

blogthingMy Thoughts: 

How to Bake a Chocolate Soufflé  is a book about three college friends and how their lives grow apart and find each other again after college. I found that the moral of the story was that life may not always end up how you seem, but if you keep the people who love you around it will always be a good time.

The three protagonists are all completely different people – a science major, music major, and a business major – but their friendship is something that is unbreakable. What I loved about the book was that even though they drifted apart over time their true friendship came out when they all reunited after 18 years without seeing each other.

This is the first time in a while where I can honestly say I didn’t have a least favourite story line – all three girls (Annie, Audrey, and Maddie) all had compelling storylines that intrigued me and I always wanted to know more.

I did have a few issues with the formatting of the book; I didn’t like that you only got a little of each character’s lives every couple of years – it certainly left me with a lot of questions that I desperately wanted answers to right away. It just made it seem almost jumpy, especially when things are being referred to before they fill you in on what was missed. It is something you have to get used to, but I just would have preferred more! A lot of the time I just wasn’t ready to let the chapter to end when it did.

One cool thing about this book was that it included recipes at the end of most chapters. As someone who doesn’t cook I liked that they were there, but I personally won’t try the recipes. On the other hand, for people who read this book and love to cook it will give them some great recipes to try out (if anyone wants to make me the chocolate soufflé I wouldn’t say no).

All in all, I did enjoy reading this book; it was fun, emotional, and a great book about friendship and growing up. I just wish I got to know more about their lives!

My Rating: 

3.5 out of 5 stars.

Favourite Quote: 

“Human  nature  is  complex,  Audrey.  If we only study the easy parts, the safe beauty and the accepted wisdom, and avoid the complex, ugly interpretations and the challenges to accepted boundaries of good and evil, we fail to try to live up to our divine potential.”  

January and February Reading Wrap Up

Wrap Up

I completely forgot to do a wrap up for the past few months, and I really want to get back into this so I decided to combine my January and February!

There are eight books to talk about here so let’s get started and let me know if you want to see a full review of any of these books!

The Shock of the Fall by Nathan Filer

Quick Review: The Shock of the Fall was the first book I read in 2015! Not a bad way to start of this reading year if I do say so myself. I found it a little difficult to get through at the beginning but before I knew it I was completely entranced by this story about a boy dealing with his mental illness. It is beautiful, raw, and real book that, I believe, does a great job in portraying a character’s mental illness. It was just really good and I definitely recommend it…though prepare to become extremely frustrated with the unreliable narrator because well, you’ll see.

My Rating: 4 out of 5 stars.

The Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett

Quick Review: I’ve had this book on my shelf for a LONG time now after a friend, so kindly, forced me to purchase it when she found out I hadn’t read any Terry Pratchett novels. Long story short, I thoroughly enjoyed the adventure this novel took me on – especially the wee free men. The book features such strong female characters that I think all girls need to read this series of books. I plan on, eventually, finishing this series as it follows the growth of the main character. My only issue with this is the long chapters…I much prefer a novel with a lot of shorter chapters (personal opinion though).

My Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness

Quick Review: I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, Patrick Ness has very quickly become one of my favourite authors. I finished this book in one afternoon. It was pure brilliance. There really isn’t any other way for my to explain it. I still feel so much thinking about the story. I purchased the illustrated edition and I think it just added a whole other layer to this beautiful story. The book was so heartbreakingly beautiful. I’m pretty sure I cried for 20 minutes after finishing it. READ IT, READ IT, READ IT.

My Rating: 5 out of 5 stars (duh).

Bridget Jones’s Diary by Helen Fielding

Quick Review: After the emotional turmoil I felt after A Monster Calls I needed something super quick, fluffy, and fun. I took a look at my TBR shelf and figured no one could cheer my up quite like Bridget Jones. I wasn’t wrong. This was the perfect cure for the heartbreak I was facing after my previous read. It made me laugh so much…also made me want to rewatch the movie, but when don’t I want to rewatch Bridget Jones’s Diary. If you are looking for a super fun, quick read I definitely suggest you pick this up if you are like me and have yet to do it yet.

My Rating: 4.5 out of 5 for making me feel so much better after A Monster Calls.

Sold by Patricia McCormick

Quick Review: I’m not sure the book needed to be written in free verse because it reads fine as in prose, but the book provides the sad truth that young girls are still unknowingly being sold into prostitution in third world countries and it’s completely heartbreaking what these girls have to face. I’m always grateful when a book like this is thoroughly researched so big ups to the author who traveled India and Nepal to interview women of Calcutta’s red light district and as well as girls who have been rescued in order to write this book. It’s a really fast, but extremely powerful read so go forth and read on.

My Rating: 4.7 out of 5 (for the free verse)

How To Bake a Chocolate Soufflé by Carly Ellen Kramer

Quick Review: This book was given to me as part of the book tour which I am partaking in. I don’t want to say too much here because I full review of this novel will by posted on March 7th (so keep an eye out for that), but I can say that while there where a few issues with the flow of the book I did enjoy it overall. It was nice to see the relationships in the books grow apart but then snap back together again when it is really needed. It really speaks to the power of friendship and I completely stand by that message. I just wish it had given me more because the story was lacking certain details that, as a reader, you are craving to know about!

My Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

If I Stay by Gayle Formam

Quick Review: This is one of those books that I bough a long time ago when it was on sale at Costco and just didn’t get around to reading it. And when I finally did all I really thought was: meh. It was okay. I mean, I cried but with the nature of the book it was hard not to. I just couldn’t believe any of the characters; they all seemed just over the top stereotypical. There were lines where I just though: really?! I think it is safe to say that I didn’t want to rush a pick up the second one. And can I just say, because I knew there was a second one there was no suspense on the question of what choice she was going to make. Meh…just meh.

My Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

Hyperbole and a Half: Unfortunate Situations, Flawed Coping Mechanisms, Mayhem, and Other Things That Happened by Allie Brosh

Quick Review: I think this is one time I was happy not have been a superfan of something before it moved to book form. Because I was familiar with Allie Brosh’s drawings online, but didn’t really keep up with them I could fully appreciate this book from beginning to end. I was even pleasantly surprised to see some of my favourites in the book. Hyperbole and a Half made my laugh out loud so many time. I was obsessed with the style it was written and drawn in and also with her dogs. I loved this so much and I’m so happy I got to read it.

My Rating: 5 out of 5 stars